Campaigners warned to mind their language to avoid inciting Brexit violence

Campaigners warned to mind their language to avoid inciting Brexit violence

A senior Metropolitan Police Officer has warned politicians and Brexit campaigners should avoid using inflammatory language as the debate about the UK’s future rages on.

Met Assistant Commissioner and National Police Chiefs Council Chairman Martin Hewitt wants people to think carefully about what they say as it could incite violence.

The BBC reports that the NPCC has taken the ‘precautionary’ measure of placing 10,000 officers on standby, should civil disorder erupt following a deal or no-deal Brexit solution.
 
However, they would only be deployed in a worst-case scenario it said.
 
Assistant Commissioner Hewitt told the BBC that there was a lot of ‘angry talk’ about Brexit on social media.
“I think there is a responsibility on those individuals that have a platform and have a voice to communicate in a way that is temperate and is not in any way going to inflame people's views,” he said.
 
Met officers in charge of policing Parliament said they have seen an increase in abuse aimed at politicians, while several MPs have requested increased security the BBC says.
 
NPCC Lead for Operations CC Charlie Hall said while there was no evidence of a likely increase in civil unrest post Brexit forces across the UK were ‘prepared to respond’.
 
Issues identified by the NPCC include rioting, looting, major protests and transport issues.
 
The NPCC says specialised teams such as dog handlers, armed police and search-trained officers would be available, while 1,000 officers have received extra training so they could be deployed to Northern Ireland.
 
But CC Hall said that those in charge of supplying food, fuel and other essentials would have to make their own preparations as officers will only be used "if absolutely necessary".
 
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-47806365